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Nevada Law Library

Employment Discrimination

It is an unlawful employment practice for an employer to discriminate against any person with respect to the personís compensation, terms, conditions or privileges of employment because of race, color, religion, sec, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age (40 and older), disability or national origin.

Dennis v. Nevada, 282 F. Supp. 2d 1177, at 1181 (D. Nev. 2003); Switzer v. Rivera, 174 F. Supp. 2d 1097 (D. Nev. 2001); Wolber v. Service Corp. Intíl, 612 F. Supp. 235 (D. Nev. 1985).Under federal law, companies with 15 or more employees are covered by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the primary law prohibiting employment discrimination, the Americans with Disabilities Act, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability, and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, which prohibits discrimination based on genetic information. Companies with 20 or more employees are subject to the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the federal law that prohibits discrimination against employees 40 years or older. Companies with four or more employees must comply with the employment discrimination provisions of the Immigration Reform and Control Act, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of citizenship status. And all companies of any size must pay men and women equally for doing equal work, by virtue of the Equal Pay Act.In Nevada, companies with 15 or more employees are subject to the state's antidiscrimination law.